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Bully Pulpit

The term "bully pulpit" stems from President Theodore Roosevelt's reference to the White House as a "bully pulpit," meaning a terrific platform from which to persuasively advocate an agenda. Roosevelt often used the word "bully" as an adjective meaning superb/wonderful. The Bully Pulpit features news, reasoned discourse, opinion and some humor.

Friday, October 31, 2008

Not-So-Straight Ticket

Old Democrat voting rule may hurt Obama in N.C.

(By Doug Heye, National Review Online) - With North Carolina coming down to the wire, an obscure voting statute is coming into play. In the Tar Heel state, a straight-ticket vote does not include the presidential or statewide judicial candidates. Voters much make those votes separately to have their vote counted.

For the judges, their offices are officially non-partisan so that can be disregarded. But on the presidential level, where the campaigns are decidedly partisan, the law could have a definite impact on the outcome.

For many voters, the process is confusing. After all, why would a straight ticket vote not include all candidates from a particular party?

As Mike Baker of the Associated Press Raleigh bureau points out, the law was created by the Democrats.

1 Comments:

Blogger Steve Brenneis said...

The law stuck during the 1970s, 1980s, and into the 1990s because North Carolinians voted for Republican Presidents. Democrats were afraid that a straight-party ticket that included the Presidential race would hurt local Democrats if it became easier to pick a Republican President that way.

Friday, October 31, 2008 8:45:00 PM  

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